Oswego County Today: Artswego Series Opens With Matt Haimovitz’s Traveling Bach Cello Suites

August 30, 2015

OSWEGO — Renowned cellist Matt Haimovitz will launch the season’s Artswego Performing Arts Series at SUNY Oswego with the unaccompanied cello suites of Johann Sebastian Bach performed in four different campus and community locations on Sept. 15 and 16.

Cellist Matt Haimovitz, who as a prodigy played with Zubin Mehta at 13 and recorded with the Chicago Symphony at 17, now takes it to the streets. He will offer a four-stop "Moveable Feast" of Bach suites Sept. 15-16, concluding with a performance for SUNY Oswego's Performing Arts Series at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

Cellist Matt Haimovitz, who as a prodigy played with Zubin Mehta at 13 and recorded with the Chicago Symphony at 17, now takes it to the streets. He will offer a four-stop “Moveable Feast” of Bach suites Sept. 15-16, concluding with a performance for SUNY Oswego’s Performing Arts Series at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

With earlier stops in Syracuse, downtown Oswego and the college’s Penfield Library, the musical tour will conclude with Haimovitz’ ticketed performance of the last three Bach suites and accompanying overtures in solo recital in at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, in SUNY Oswego’s Sheldon Hall ballroom. Continue reading

The Charlotte Observer: A cup of coffee, Bach and a cool musician

March 23, 2015

An internationally known cellist lands in Charlotte for one night to play Bach. And the venue he picks is … a coffeehouse?

Well, why not? Johann Sebastian – whose 330th birthday is March 31, by the way – sometimes heard his music played in intimate, informal venues. He liked coffee, writing one of his few secular cantatas (BWV 211) about its delights. A soprano sings “Ah! How sweet coffee tastes,/ More delicious than a thousand kisses,/ milder than muscatel wine” and vows any prospective husband must swear he’ll let her make the brown brew daily. Continue reading

Free Times: Concerts in Columbia: March 19-25

Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Matt Haimovitz | photo by Stephanie McKinnon

Thursday 19

Matt Haimovitz — Matt Haimovitz — who ranks among the world’s very best cellists — is performing his interpretation of Bach’s six solo cello suites not at a buttoned-up recital hall but at a venerable dive. Haimovitz has been bringing classical chamber music out of the conservatory and into intimate, alternative spaces for 15 years now, boldly going where other classical musicians fear to tread. In the process, he’s reinvigorated classical music with a punk spirit. — Patrick Wall

New Brookland Tavern: 8 p.m., $10; 791-4413,newbrooklandtavern.com

Read at: Free Times

Hamilton Spectator: Rocky’s rundown on JunoFest

March 11, 2015

Classical

With all the pop fanfare of the awards’ telecast, people forget that the Junos has a highbrow element as well. The Church of St. John the Evangelist, at Charlton and Locke, will host two classically oriented concerts. The first, on Friday at 7:30 p.m., features Hamilton-born singer-songwriter Jeremy Fisher, a nominee in the adult contemporary category, plus the HPO Brass Quintet, Capella Intima, Emma Rush and Vox Metropolis. On Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m., Juno nominees Matt Haimovitz (cello) and Paul Stewart (piano), theBlythwood Winds and Piano Duo 2×10.

By: Graham Rockingham

Read at: Hamilton Spectator

Montreal Gazette: Seven Days, Seven Nights: The Damn Truth, Elephant Stone in a must-see show this week

March 11, 2015

Internationally acclaimed cellist Matt Haimovitz and pianist Christopher O’Riley play an all-Beethoven program at Salle Bourgie (1339 Sherbrooke St. W.) at 7:30 p.m. This tour has them “going period” with O’Riley playing an 1823 Broadwood fortepiano and Haimovitz’s 1710 Matteo Gofriller cello set up with ox-gut strings. Admission: $30.50. Tickets: 514-285-2000 or www.mbam.qc.ca.

By: Richard Burnett

Read at: Montreal Gazette

Second Inversion: NEW VIDEOS: Matt Haimovitz and Christopher O’Riley at the Tractor Tavern

February 19, 2015

In case you missed these on Facebook and Twitter, be sure to check out these videos with Matt Haimovitz and Christopher O’Riley from the iconic Tractor Tavern in the heart of Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood.

(Yes, that is a styrofoam cup in Matt’s cello)

(Beethoven in a Bar… why not?!)

Read at: Second Inversion

SF Examiner: Duo plays Beethoven as Beethoven would have wished

February 05, 2015
Cellist Matt Haimovitz and pianist Christopher O’Riley play Beethoven on period instruments at the S.F. Conservatory or Music. - COURTESY  PHOTO

Rarely does an encounter with the past forever change a musician’s relationship with his instrument. But when Grammy-nominated cellist Matt Haimovitz joined with pianist-NPR host Christopher O’Riley to perform and record Beethoven’s Sonatas and Variations for Piano and Cello on period instruments, he hardly expected that their move to authenticity would open an entirely new range of musical possibilities.When Matt, as he prefers to be called, outfitted his precious 1710 Goffriller cello with the same authentic ox-gut strings that were used in Beethoven’s day, and played them with a bow from Beethoven’s era, he discovered the changes were like night and day.

“I love the gut so much!” he exclaimed in a conference call with his duo partner. “Gut is so much more human to me, and it allows me so much more flexibility and range of attack and resonance. My fear with gut strings all along was that I was going to lose my voice. Quite the opposite has happened. More and more, I’m finding that the sound of gut strings is my ideal.”

That’s quite a switch for someone who wrote his graduate thesis on Beethoven at Harvard 25 years ago, and who has struggled ever since with the fact that, in Beethoven, a cello outfitted with modern metal strings does not balance well with a modern piano.

When the duo arrives at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music on Tuesday night, Chris will play the same 1823 Broadwood fortepiano he used for the recording. On loan from the Beethoven Center at San Jose State, it’s very similar to the Broadwood in Beethoven’s possession. Tuning both fortepiano and cello a microtone lower than “modern pitch” will further replicate the sound that Beethoven heard in his head.

“There’s a whole world of color and articulation available when you’re not having to worry 80 percent of the time whether you’ll be heard or not,” says Chris of the period instruments’ superior blend. “If I had known 30 years ago what I know now, I wouldn’t have had to deal with the fact that the modern Steinway’s bass, as much as I love it, is at complete odds with a lot of Beethoven’s music. On the fortepiano, the bass is still penetrating, but the upper, lyric registers are much more singing.”

Since Chris no longer has to hold back, and Matt no longer needs to struggle to be heard over a 9-foot concert grand, Beethoven’s music should flow in a manner seldom heard with modern instruments.

“When we play the slow movement of the last sonata,” says Matt, “I don’t think you have to know anything about music to just close your eyes and take in such a hauntingly beautiful sound world.”

IF YOU GO

Beethoven, Period

with Matt Haimovitz and Christopher O’Riley

Where: S.F. Conservatory of Music, 50 Oak St., S.F.

When: 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10

Tickets: Free

Contact: (415) 503-6275, http://www.sfcm.edu

Read at: SF Examiner

San Francisco Classical Voice: From the Top Loves the S.F. Conservatory

February 4, 2015
Christopher O'Riley

Christopher O’Riley, photo by Edy Perez

 

It’s been a while, seven years, since the popular NPR musical talent show From the Tophas been back to San Francisco. The show is planning to tape a show at the S.F. Conservatory on Feb. 14.

The taping caps a week in which From the Top host Christopher O’Riley will be in residence at the Conservatory giving concerts with cellist Matt Haimovitz.

Unusually, this edition of the radio show will focus on performers from the Conservatory’s pre-collegiate division, including soloists 16-year-old cellist Elena Ariza from Cupertino; 15-year-old pianist Elliot Wuu from Fremont; and 14-year-old violinist Kevin Zhu from Cupertino. Conservatory alums Haimovitz and soprano Lisa Delan will premiere parts of the “music storybook” Angel Heart (based on stories by Cornelia Funke and with music by Luna Pearl Woolf) on the same program. Normally, the auditions for From the Top include a geographical region, so this is a little feather in the cap for the Conservatory.

The radio episode airs nationally on March 9. For tickets to the taping, call 415.503.6275 or visit this Conservatory website.

BY MICHAEL ZWIEBACH

Read at: San Francisco Classical Voice

The Seattle Times: Next at the Tractor Tavern: fortepiano and cello

CONCERT PREVIEW

‘BEETHOVEN, Period’

8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 2, Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave N.W., Seattle; $20 (206- 789-3599 or tractortavern.com).

When two artists title their concert “BEETHOVEN, Period,” it’s reasonable to assume that they’re referring to Beethoven as the end-all and be-all of composers. Or perhaps they’re alluding to his pivotal position as the “bridge” composer between the classical and romantic periods.

While Grammy-nominated cellist Matt Haimovitzand pianist and NPR host Christopher O’Rileywould hardly dispute Beethoven’s compositional supremacy, the title actually refers to their exploration of his sonatas and variations for piano and cello on period instruments. In advance of the release of their double-disc high-resolution recording on Pentatone, the duo arrives at the Tractor Tavern in Seattle on Monday, Feb. 2, to perform Beethoven’s music as the composer expected it to be heard.

Haimovitz’s precious Goffriller cello, which dates from 1710, 60 years before Beethoven’s birth, will be outfitted with authentic ox-gut strings, just as in Beethoven’s day. His bow, too, will be from the same era. Sonically, these changes are like night and day.

“I love the gut so much!” Haimovitz exclaimed in a conference call that included his duo partner. “Gut is so much more human to me, and it allows me so much more flexibility and range of attack and resonance. My fear with gut strings all along was that I was going to lose my voice. Quite the opposite has happened. More and more, I’m finding that the sound of gut strings is my ideal.”

That’s quite a switch for someone who wrote his graduate thesis on Beethoven at Harvard 25 years ago, and who has struggled ever since with the fact that, in Beethoven, a cello outfitted with modern metal strings does not balance well with a modern piano.

O’Riley, in turn, will play an authentic fortepiano, whose sound Beethoven also had in mind. Tuning a microtone lower than “modern pitch” will further replicate the sound of Beethoven’s era.

“There’s a whole world of color and articulation available when you’re not having to worry 80 percent of the time whether you’ll be heard or not,” he says of the period instruments’ superior blend. “If I had known 30 years ago what I know now, I wouldn’t have had to deal with the fact that the modern Steinway’s bass, as much as I love it, is at complete odds with a lot of Beethoven’s music. On the fortepiano, the bass is still penetrating, but the upper, lyric registers are much more singing.”

All of this talk may seem a little highfalutin’ for an evening in a honky-tonk bar, but Haimovitz has nothing but praise for the Tractor. At the forefront of musicians who brought classical to new audiences in nontraditional venues, he discovered the Tractor some years back when he played the Bach Cello Suites there. He’s been back several times since.

“It’s really one of my favorite alternate venues to play,” he says. “The people are really passionate about music. It’s great energy and a great, fun vibe.”

Since he no longer needs to struggle to be heard over a 9-foot concert grand, and O’Riley no longer has to hold back, their vibes, too, should be quite high. What better place to perform music that took the piano/cello combination to new heights?

“There’s a sense in these groundbreaking pieces that Beethoven is pushing the limits of what the instruments can do separately and together,” says Haimovitz. “When we play the slow movement of the last sonata, I don’t think you have to know anything about music to just close your eyes and take in such a hauntingly beautiful sound world.”

Jason Victor Serinus writes about classical music and high-end audio for publications worldwide. Reach him at jserinus@gmail.com.

By Jason Victor Serinus

Read at: The Seattle Times

LA Daily News: Upcoming classical music events in the Los Angeles area

January 26, 2015

“Crossover” has become one of the hot buzzwords of the music scene in recent years as classical musicians seek to broaden their horizons by moving into non-classical fare. Two of the foremost exponents of this phenomenon, pianist Christopher O’Riley and cellist Matt Haimovitz, will showcase this concept on Thursday in CSUN’s Valley Performing Arts Center.

Rather than performing before an audience of up to 1,700 in VPAC’s Grand Hall or even in the 500-seat Plaza del Sol, O’Riley and Haimovitz will play to 200 patrons, who will be seated on the Grand Hall stage. The program — titled “Shuffle, Play, Listen” (the same title as a CD released in 2011) — starts at 7:30 p.m. and will feature music from such disparate composers as J.S. Bach, Igor Stravinsky, Radiohead and Arcade Fire.

Although O’Riley is one of this generation’s top pianists, he is perhaps better known as the host of the NPR program “From the Top” (6 p.m. Sundays on KUSC). Haimovitz, who made his debut at age 13 with Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic and his recording debut shortly thereafter on Deutsche Grammophon with James Levine and the Chicago Symphony, mixes appearances at concert halls throughout the world with gigs at clubs and coffee houses.

By Robert D. Thomas

Read at: LA Daily News